Parsnips

Parsnips

The parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) is a root vegetable related to the carrot. Parsnips resemble carrots, but are paler than most of them and have a stronger flavor. Like carrots, parsnips are native to Eurasia and have been eaten there since ancient times. Zohary and Hopf note that the archeological evidence for the cultivation of the parsnip is “still rather limited,” and that Greek and Roman literary sources are a major source about its early use, but warn "there are some difficulties in distinguishing between parsnip and carrot (which, in Roman times, were white or purple) in classical writings since both vegetables seem to have been sometimes called pastinaca yet each vegetable appears to be well under cultivation in Roman times.

Details about Parsnips

Crop Availability
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Product Characteristics
  • Smooth, whitish skin
  • Resembles carrots in shape
  • Sweet, nutty flavour
Care and Handling
  • Ideal storage temperatures: 33°F / 0.5°C
  • Humidity between 90 - 95%
  • Maintain moisture level to minimize shriveling
  • Provide adequate protection against temperature extremes
Nutritional Information
per 67 g serving (1/2 cup / 125 mL)
  • Energy
    53 Cal (220 kJ)
  • Protein
    0.8 g
  • Fat
    0.2 g
  • Carbohydrate
    12.0 g
  • Dietary Fibre
    3.3 g
  • Sodium
    7 mg
  • Potassium
    251 mg
Industry Benefits
  • Consistent high quality
  • Continuity of supply
  • Multiple pack alternatives
  • Delivered quotations anywhere
  • Excellent customer service
Preparation Tips
  • Trim tops and root ends
  • Rinse, scrub, or peel skins
  • Leave whole, slice, dice, cut into sticks or shred
  • Boil, steam, microwave, bake, stir-fry or deep fry
  • Add to stews, soups or serve glazed, mashed, creamed or raw as an appetizer
Daily Recommended Intake %
  • Vitamin C
    19 %
  • Thiamin
    5 %
  • Folacin
    2 %
  • Pantothenic Acid
    6 %
  • Magnesium
    8 %
  • Iron
    3 %